Monthly Archives: September 2019

Sept 23 2019 – European Links and the Coburg Conference – Chichester [Oct 10-14 2019]

https://web.archive.org/web/20171228223404/http://www.chichestercathedral.org.uk/about-us/european-links.shtml

European Links

The Diocese of Chichester has links with the United Church of Berlin-Brandenburg, the Lutheran Evangelical Church (EKD) District of Bayreuth, Bavaria, and the Roman Catholic Diocese of Bamberg, Bavaria. Regionalbischof Dr Dorothea Greiner of Bayreuth, and Domkapitular Professor Wolfgang Klausnitzer are Canons of Honour of Chichester Cathedral.

The biennial “Coburg Conference” brings together representatives of the churches of Chichester, Berlin, Bayreuth and Bamberg; and the biennial “Feuerstein Conference” is a meeting of seminarians, theological students and curates. There are musical exchanges and visits involving Chichester Cathedral. There are also partnerships between many parishes in the Diocese and Catholic and Lutheran parishes in Bavaria as well as Berlin and other parts of Germany.

The Cathedral’s link with Chartres was established as part of the civic twinning between the two cities. In 2003 the Bishop of Chartres preached in Chichester Cathedral and the Bishop of Chichester preached in Chartres Cathedral. The Cathedral’s Seffrid Guild made cushions for the chairs of the Bishop and the eucharistic celebrant in Chartres Cathedral. The Dean & Rector of Chartres Cathedral, The Very Reverend Canon Dominique Aubert, is a Canon of Honour of Chichester. As with the German links, there are regular musical visits and exchanges.

Sept 15 2019 – “Now try saying sorry for your own mistakes, Archbishop…” – Peter Hitchens – Mail on Sunday

“Now try saying sorry for your own mistakes, Archbishop…” – Peter Hitchens – Mail on Sunday

mail

Peter Hitchens

I do worry about Archbishop Justin Welby. 

Does he know anything? Does he understand his own religion? 

There he lies flat on his face in the Indian city of Amritsar, regretting a massacre he didn’t carry out 100 years ago. 

It was pretty thoroughly condemned at the time, and its culprit was forced to resign.

Archbishop Justin Welby laid flat on his face in the Indian city of Amritsar

Christianity is about recognising your own faults, Archbishop. 

Get some practice. Explicitly and fully apologise for your Church’s decision to publicly smear the great, late Bishop George Bell, now shown beyond doubt to be the result of a one-sided, sloppy kangaroo court.

No need to lie on the floor.

Just say sorry for a foolish, unfair mistake, and the vanity that has prevented you from admitting it.

IMG_3470

Dear Editor

Earlier this month, at Westminster Abbey, there was a Service of Thanksgiving for the politician and diplomat Lord ‘Paddy’ Ashdown who died last year.

In the Epilogue of his last book – “Nein! Standing Up To Hitler 1935-1944” – Lord Ashdown concludes:

“There are also, as Dietrich Bonhoeffer and Bishop Bell argued, moral questions to be addressed here”

Later next month, in Chichester Cathedral*, some of those questions will be addressed at the Coburg Conference which “will focus on Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s and George Bell’s work, and what it can teach us in the light of today’s political situation”. 

Yours sincerely 

Richard W. Symonds

The Bell Society

 

* October 10th to 14th. Venue: 4 Canon Lane (formerly George Bell House), Chichester Cathedral

Dear Editor

Earlier this month, at Westminster Abbey, there was a Service of Thanksgiving for the politician and diplomat Lord ‘Paddy’ Ashdown who died last year.

In the Epilogue of his last book – “Nein! Standing Up To Hitler 1935-1944” – Lord Ashdown concludes:

“There are also, as Dietrich Bonhoeffer and Bishop Bell argued, moral questions to be addressed here”

Later next month, in Chichester Cathedral*, some of those questions will be addressed at the Coburg Conference which “will focus on Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s and George Bell’s work, and what it can teach us in the light of today’s political situation”.

 

Yours sincerely

Richard W. Symonds

The Bell Society

 

* October 10th to 14th. Venue: 4 Canon Lane (formerly George Bell House), Chichester Cathedral

Nicholas Reade on Bishop Bell – Extracts from “Rarely Ordinary Time – Some Memoirs” [Rother 2019]

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Bishop George Bell

Nicholas Reade on Bishop Bell – Extracts from “Rarely Ordinary Time – Some Memoirs” [Rother 2019]

Page 30-33

As well as being Chairman of the Liturgical Commission, Dr. Jasper was an historian, and, a few years previously, had written the life of Arthur Cayley Headlam of Gloucester. At that time, we were all awaiting the publication of his biography of George Bell, Bishop of Chichester [1929-58], one of the greatest bishops ever produced by the Church of England, who many expected to become the Archbishop of Canterbury in 1943, when William Temple died suddenly.

Bishop Bell was a courageous church leader, who had helped Jews and others to escape from Nazi Germany, and spoken out in the House of Lords against the indiscriminate bombing of German cities in the Second World War. He was a great ecumenist, theologian, and patron of the arts and a much-loved pastor. Christine had spent her previous summer holidays working on the index of this long-awaited biography.

Dr. Jasper was always very humble and modest about his work and scholarship, and would seldom initiate conversation about what he had achieved. As I became more involved with the family, I sensed that Bishop Bell had almost become part of the household, so the revelation fifty-seven years after his death that the Church had made an apology to one complainant, on the grounds that the Bishop had abused her between sixty-five and seventy-five years ago, seemed utterly unbelievable. 

While the Church has been careful not to say that the Bishop is guilty, it has ruined his reputation. Originally, no information was given as to the process by which the Church had come to this conclusion, other than the statement that ‘experts’ had been involved. Such secrecy was hard to countenance in an age of ‘transparency’. As a family, and in common many others, we expressed our concern in the church press, and have continued to do so. In 2017, the Core Group Report was seriously criticised by Lord Carlile QC in his review into the Church’s handling of the complaint.

Of course, it is right and proper that the Church investigates thoroughly every complaint made against every person and however famous and respected – and however ancient. Given, from the beginning, how shaky and questionable the allegation against Bishop Bell appeared to be, what has greatly concerned me is that the bishops of the Church of England, who, certainly in the past, had a fine reputation for standing against injustice and for being unafraid of making themselves unpopular, have expressed not one word of concern at the destruction of Bishop Bell – with the exception of the Bishop of Peterborough, in a speech in the House of Lords, and, more recently, the Bishop of Chester. A couple of retired bishops have voiced our concerns and given support to the George Bell Group, but our view carries little weight.

An allegation is made against him around sixty-five years later; he is tried by, frankly, what looks like a kangaroo court – with nobody to speak up for him, as Lord Carlile pointed out. Not a single bishop was prepared to query publicly what was being said, and how it was being dealt with. The left-leaning newspapers, always eager to campaign on miscarriages of justice, have given scant support to those of us concerned concerned at the traducing of Bell’s reputation.

It has been left to The Daily Telegraph, The Times and The Daily Mail and The Mail on Sunday to write powerfully about the basic principles of justice being ignored by the Church. The Church is the Sacrament of the Kingdom, and becomes what she is meant to be in the celebration of the Eucharist – this keeps me going. It is the institutional church that gets so much wrong (as I know, also, from my own mistakes). I can therefore understand the anger and the real disappointment of the person who told me that ‘the whole episode’ of the church’s handling of the Bishop Bell situation ‘puts you off church-going’.

My first concern as a bishop has always been for the survivor (even though I am aware of falling short some twenty-two years ago, when measured alongside today’s strict and excellent standards); but until it can be proven beyond all reasonable doubt that Bishop Bell abused a child, I will continue to call upon George Bell within the Communion of Saints to pray with me and for me. Meanwhile, I continue to treasure on my bookshelves Bishop Bell’s copy of The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church, given to himon 7 October 1957.

Much has changed concerning Bishop Bell’s reputation following further enquiries, and the long awaited report of the Right Worshipful Timothy Briden, Vicar-General of Canterbury. What will not change, is the inadequate original investigation, and that George Bell, one of the ‘saints’ of the Church of England, who is commemorated every year (3rd Oct) in our liturgical calendar as bishop, ecumenist, and peacemaker (1958), should for the last four years have been cast into the wilderness by the Church he served with love and the greatest distinction.

Page 88 & 89

I was sorry, also, to say farewell to Bishop Kenneth Skelton, the Diocesan Bishop. I admired him in many ways; he took time to get to know his clergy and was generous with the time and encouragement he gave to me as a young incumbent. Although he came across as shy initially, I found him very easy – and it helped that he could always see the humour in situations. He had the gift of drawing out the best in people. He was a truly pastoral bishop, who worked collaboratively and strategically. This remarkably gifted man, whose leadership was prophetic, appears to have been forgotten about in the Church of Rngland – possibly because he was a very humble person.

Kenneth had served as Bishop of Matabeleland from 1962 to 1970 in western Rhodesia, where he was deeply respected as a pastor and theologian, and where he championed the cause of the black majority, inevitably clashing with many politicians. he wrote a gripping account of his ministry in Matabeleland, ‘Bishop in Smith’s Rhodesia’ (Mambo Press, 1985). The Law and Order Minister called him ‘The Devil’s Advocate’, and stated that the government was watching him.

He was also dubbed ‘Red Skelton’, after the American comedian. Some commented that Kenneth could best be compared in the Church of England with Bishop George Bell, for both worked tirelessly for social justice and were fearless in speaking out.

Page 111

As with the four other parishes I had worked in, I lost no time in getting down to work – but this was a somewhat larger area and responsibility than I had experienced before; there was a huge in-tray demanding my attention. Every day new issues would hit my desk.

On my first day, I visited Bishop Bell School – now called St. Catherine’s College – the large Church of England secondary school in the Langney area of Eastbourne, opened by H.R.H. Princess Margaret in 1958 and dedicated by Bishop Bell. This was his last act after twenty-nine years as bishop, and he was to die shortly afterwards. He had specifically requested that the school be built in a less affluent and expanding area of Eastbourne. Whenever I entered that building, which also housed his mitre and crozier. I never felt that this courageous and truly great bishop was far away.

Page 261

17. You have a great respect for Bishop George Bell and have expressed concerns about how the allegation made against him has been handled by the Church of England.

Yes indeed – and I am joined in this by many from around the world. Others much better qualified than me to make a judgement have taken the view, from the earliest stages of the allegation, that the evidence was not compelling. I have yet to meet anyone, anywhere, who has looked at the facts available and believes that the handling of this allegation reflects credit on the Church. One comment was ‘what a circus’ – which would be amusing if the case were not so serious. It has of course been extremely difficult to find out much about it, because of the lack of transparency.

To be fair to those who have dealt with this, and in the light of the public reaction, Lord Carlile QC was invited to review how the Church handled the whole matter. His report leaves the Church with the very difficult task of ensuring that we will never again allow such an injustice to occur. I am surprised the Church did not understand that any institution seeking to act as investigator, accuser, judge and jury cannot deliver justice.

I came across a memo, and I cannot remember where it came from, of what Lord Woolton said to Bishop George Bell on 9 February 1944, just before he made his courageous speech against the indiscriminate bombing of German cities: ‘George, there isn’t a soul in this House who doesn’t wish you wouldn’t make the speech you are going to make…you must know that. But I also want to tell you that there isn’t a soul who doesn’t know that the only reason why you make it, is because you believe it is your duty to make it as a Christian priest’.

That is the Bishop Bell we will all remember, along with his many other heroic deeds. It is tragic, as the Bell Group Press Release of 15 December 2017 argued, that the institutional church today deprived this bishop, who has been dead for over sixty years, of the presumption of innocence or of due process…

The Archbishop of Canterbury and the Bishop of Chichester have faced severe criticism for the way in which this whole matter has been handled, and tendered their apologies for it.

Lord Carlile QC, who conducted the 2017 independent investigation into the Bishop Bell allegations, forwarded a Statement to be read out at the Bell Society meeting on 4 February 2019, in the building that used to be called George Bell House, Chichester. It contained the following words:

“I hope that this event will add to the clamour for the Church to admit the awful mistakes it has made in dealing with unsubstantiated allegations against Bishop Bell. His name should never have been publicised before allegations were investigated. The Church should now accept that my recommendations should be accepted in full, and that after due process, however delayed, George Bell should be declared by the Church to be innocent of the allegations made against him”

With the dedication of the Bishop Bell statue in Canterbury Cathedral (where he served as Dean between 1924 and 1929), it is to be hoped that a line may be drawn under this sad episode, banishing any shadow over Bishop Bell’s good name – for surely, his character and all he achieved by the grace of God are conjoined.

 

_________________________________________

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/sep/10/justin-welby-apologises-in-name-of-christ-british-massacre-amritsar

“But can you apologise for the massacre of Bishop Bell’s reputation, Archbishop? We can all apologise for something we can do nothing about – that’s easy – but find it hard to apologise for something we can do something about. Matthew 7 v 5 applies to us all” ~ Richard W. Symonds

Welby “can apologise when it suits” ~ Peter Crosskey

“Now try saying sorry for your own mistakes, Archbishop…” – Peter Hitchens – Mail on Sunday

I do worry about Archbishop Justin Welby. 

Does he know anything? Does he understand his own religion? 

There he lies flat on his face in the Indian city of Amritsar, regretting a massacre he didn’t carry out 100 years ago. 

It was pretty thoroughly condemned at the time, and its culprit was forced to resign.

Archbishop Justin Welby laid flat on his face in the Indian city of Amritsar

 

Archbishop Justin Welby laid flat on his face in the Indian city of Amritsar

Christianity is about recognising your own faults, Archbishop. 

Get some practice. Explicitly and fully apologise for your Church’s decision to publicly smear the great, late Bishop George Bell, now shown beyond doubt to be the result of a one-sided, sloppy kangaroo court.

No need to lie on the floor.

Just say sorry for a foolish, unfair mistake, and the vanity that has prevented you from admitting it.

September 12 2019 – Times Letter Submission – Coburg, Bonhoeffer, Bell and Ashdown – Unpublished [Amended and re-submitted elsewhere]

 

 

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Dear Editor

There is much for which we can be thankful in the life and work of Paddy Ashdown (“Service of thanksgiving for Lord Ashdown of Norton-sub-Hamdon”, Times, Sept 11) – not least his well-researched last book “Nein! Standing Up To Hitler 1935-1944”.

Lord Ashdown concludes in his Epilogue:

“There are also, as Dietrich Bonhoeffer and Bishop Bell argued, moral questions to be addressed here”

Some of those “questions” will be addressed next month at the Coburg Conference in Chichester*, which “will focus on Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s and George Bell’s work, and what it can teach us, in the light of today’s political situation”.

Yours sincerely

Richard W. Symonds

The Bell Society

* October 10th to 14th 2019. Venue: 4 Canon Lane (formerly George Bell House), Chichester Cathedral Precinct, Chichester, West Sussex

 

UNPUBLISHED LETTER AMENDED AND RE-SUBMITTED ELSEWHERE – SEPT 13 2019 (Morning)

 

Dear Editor

Earlier this month, at Westminster Abbey, there was a Service of Thanksgiving for the politician and diplomat Lord ‘Paddy’ Ashdown who died last year.

In the Epilogue of his last book – “Nein! Standing Up To Hitler 1935-1944” – Lord Ashdown concludes:

“There are also, as Dietrich Bonhoeffer and Bishop Bell argued, moral questions to be addressed here”

Later next month, in Chichester Cathedral*, some of those questions will be addressed at the ecumenical Coburg Conference, which “will focus on Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s and George Bell’s work, and what it can teach us in the light of today’s political situation”.

Yours sincerely

 

Richard W. Symonds

The Bell Society

 

* October 10th to 14th 2019. Venue: 4 Canon Lane (formerly George Bell House), Chichester Cathedral Precinct, Chichester, West Sussex

SEPT 13 2019 UPDATE (Evening)

The Coburg Conference (10-14 October) will take place in Chichester Cathedral and  ‘other venues’, such as Vicars’ Hall, but NOT including 4 Canon Lane (George Bell House before 2015 name-change – Ed) ~ Secretary of Chichester Cathedral Precentor

 

2014 Impact Case Study – Bishop Bell and “Modern Church History Informing Civic-Religious Culture and Public Commemoration” – Research Excellence Framework [REF] 2014 – Dr Andrew Chandler – University of Chichester

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Dr Andrew Chandler – University of Chichester

https://impact.ref.ac.uk/casestudies/CaseStudy.aspx?Id=43776

Modern Church History Informing Civic-Religious Culture and Public Commemoration

Submitting Institution

University of Chichester

Unit of Assessment

History

Summary Impact Type

Cultural

Research Subject Area(s)

Language, Communication and Culture: Cultural Studies
History and Archaeology: Historical Studies
Philosophy and Religious Studies: Religion and Religious Studies

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Summary of the impact

Dr Chandler’s publications have been extensively used and discussed nationally and internationally by Church leaders, politicians, journalists, public intellectuals, clergy and laity. They provide informed historical context for discussion of contemporary religion and offer a site for new associations and interactions. They have also impacted on the public commemoration of historical figures who have achieved an international reputation for the religious and moral significance of their life and work. Chandler is Reader in History at the University of Chichester where his position is co-funded by the Chapter of Chichester Cathedral to support his directorship of the George Bell Institute. His research focusses on the importance of national and international politics in the modern British churches, Anglo-German Church relations and ecumenical dialogues more generally.

Underpinning research

Andrew Chandler’s research has achieved its sharpest focus in four areas:

a) the ethics of foreign policy;

b) the office of Archbishops of Canterbury;

c) the development of inter-church relations and

d) the relationship between the Church and intellectual and cultural life.

His research into the controversial public career of Bishop George Bell (1883-1958) has played a key role in exploring the historical relationship between ethics and foreign policy, with particular reference to confrontations between democracy and dictatorship, religious persecution, immigration and maintenance of international law in wartime. A landmark in this work came with the edited collection The Church and Humanity: The Life and Work of George Bell (1883-1958), (published in 2012), an international collaboration integrating the work of scholars from the United Kingdom, Germany, Finland and India, with reflections by the Archbishop of Canterbury, Rowan Williams. A further study, `Christian Ethics and the Crisis of Civilization: Bishop George Bell and the Second World War’, contributed to UNESCO supported publication Ethics and the Military (Peter Stone (ed.), UNESCO/Boydell & Brewer, 2011), pp. 55-69. The findings of this article showed the continuing significance of Bell’s interventions in the House of Lords between 1939 and 1945, particularly in the public debate about obliteration bombing and the preservation of cultural monuments. Chandler’s contribution to the 2009 Coburg ecumenical conference led to the publication of a further article, `The Little Blue Notebook: The Piety of George Bell, 1883-1958′, in a collection of studies edited by Bishop Dorothea Greiner and others for a broad church readership, Geistliche Begleitung in evangelischer Perspective; Modelle und Personen der Kirchengeschichte (Leipzig, 2013).

In addition, Chandler’s work has made available new archival findings on three Archbishops of Canterbury: Lang (1928-42), Temple (1942-4) and Fisher (1945-61), situating the office and its holders in their historical context. An extensive research essay, `The judgement of an archbishop: Cosmo Gordon Lang and British Foreign Policy, 1928-1939′, appeared in Keith Robbins and John Fisher (eds.) Religion and Diplomacy: Religion and British Foreign Policy, 1815 to 1941 (Republic of Letters, 2010), pp. 183-224. At large, such work has been closely related to his chairmanship of the international advisory board which oversees the Ashgate Archbishops of Canterbury series, a work which will seek to provide not only scholars and students but church figures and lay readers across the public with the first library of studies of all of the archbishops. Chandler’s 2012 co-authored Archbishop Fisher re-evaluates the career of the former Archbishop of Canterbury in the context of ecclesiastical, political and social reform and in the evolving landscape of the international Anglican Communion.

More recently, Chandler’s commitment to providing the churches with new materials for debate has extended to the publication of the confidential reports sent by the Archbishop of Canterbury’s representative in Rome during the Second Vatican Council, 1962-4. Chandler joined the University of Chichester as a senior lecturer on 1/7/2007, and was promoted to Reader in 2009.

References to the research

1. `The judgement of an archbishop: Cosmo Gordon Lang and British Foreign Policy, 1928- 1939′, in Keith Robbins and John Fisher (eds.) Religion and Diplomacy: Religion and British Foreign Policy, 1815 to 1941 (Republic of Letters, 2010).

2. `Christian Ethics and the Crisis of Civilization: Bishop George Bell and the Second World War’, in Peter Stone (ed.) Ethics and the Military (UNESCO/Boydell & Brewer, 2011), pp. 55-69.

3. Andrew Chandler, ed., The Church and Humanity: The Life and Work of George Bell, 1883- 1958 (Ashgate, 2012).

4. Andrew Chandler and David Hein, Archbishop Fisher: Church, State and World (Ashgate, 2012).

5. Observing Vatican II: The Reports of Bernard Pawley to Archbishop Ramsey, 1961-1965 (Cambridge University Press, 2013)

6. “Adam von Trott abroad”(2011), paper (10 pages) presented at the conference to mark the 100th anniversary of the birth of Adam von Trot organised by Protestant Academy in Berlin http://www.rhodeshouse.ox.ac.uk/page/rhodesscholarshipsgermany#sthash.zaEwpWSd.dpuf http://files.rhodes.gethifi.com/CHANDLERt.pdf

Details of the impact

Chandler’s research enriches the intellectual life of the church and provides informed historical context for those wanting to know more. It is read and used by church people across the traditions, as well as wider general audiences interested in modern Church history in Britain, Western and Eastern Europe and North America.

It (i) informs debate inside the church community and guides outside commentators. The Church press and other church writers and commentators regularly respond to Chandler’s research in print and online publication. Writers for nationally and internationally circulated church press discuss and underline the value of his research. They disseminate his findings to their readers some of whom have in turn blogged, responded or cited him in their public engagements. His research is taken as an independent voice inside the community of church thinkers. Notably, media groups used him and mediated his research knowledge on Archbishop Fisher during the anniversary of the Queen’s coronation in 2013. Here Chandler explained the role of the Church in that event, showing how the relationship between Church and State works, and provided context on the Archbishop’s precise role.

Further evidence of Chandler’s influence and impact in debates within and across denominations include his work on the Second Vatican Council. Chandler’s collaboration with Chichester Cathedral produced a new book, Observing Vatican II for the Royal Historical Society and a conference in June 2013 that brought together 15 Roman Catholics, Anglicans, Baptists, Reformed churches and Quakers to debate the projects outcomes. Much of this was chaired by the Bishop of Wakefield and Chairman of the Anglican Centre in Rome, the Rt Revd Stephen Platten. A number of those present were representing ACTA (A Call to Action), a group within English Catholicism pressing for the reform of the Church. The meeting debated the task of reforming the Church and reviewing its relationship with the contemporary world.

The research has also (ii) informed public commemoration, notably of internationally important figures whose lives blended moral understanding with political action. In 2008, Chandler’s research proved fundamental in shaping the fiftieth anniversary of Bishop Bell’s death. Here the public impact of his work combined local, national and international dimensions simultaneously. Chandler was responsible for inviting international speakers to a public conference in Chichester which combined the University, the Cathedral and the Diocese (60 delegates, 5 countries including bishops and leaders of independent foundations). He co-organised, with the Dean of Chichester, and inaugurated a series of six cathedral lectures given by politicians, church leaders including Frank Field MP, Sir Christopher Frayling (Chairman of Arts Council England at the time), Dame Mary Tanner (a President of the World Council of Churches) and theologians through the year (attended by public audiences of between 250 and 300 people). The Archbishop of Canterbury, Dr Rowan Williams, commented on Chandler’s inaugural lecture, `Andrew Chandler spoke with great insight‘. Chandler also contributed to a study course marking Bell’s Anniversary and that was used in Cathedral study days.

In addition, he played a leading advisory role working with Lord Lloyd of Berwick and Professor Emeritus Paul Foster (Chichester) in the exhibition of Bell portraits in the House of Lords formally opened at a reception of c. 80 senior politicians, peers, church leaders and public figures (including Geoffrey Howe, John Hall (Dean of Westminster), Dr Rowan Williams, and Bischof Jurgen Johannesdotter). Chandler’s account of Bell is a point of public reference in commemoration and debate on the Bishop’s life, exemplified most recently in his extensive contribution to Radio 4’s Great Lives programme on Bell (2/4/13). Peter Hitchens (the guest) confirmed Chandler’s `major part’ in the programme. In short, when Bell is discussed in the public sphere Chandler’s research is a framing and informing vector. His short popular publication on Bell (informed by research listed above) was described by the Church Times as `just what is needed’.

Chandler’s knowledge of Anglo-German relations informed the 2009 anniversary of Adam von Trott’s birth in Berlin (The initial concept of this event arose from discussions between Director of Krzyżowa memorial, Annemarie Franke, and Director of The Evangelische Akademie, Ludwig Melhorn in Berlin in 2008). A conference of c.100 people at the Akademie (Chandler, the only British speaker and the only one to talk about Trott’s relationship with Britain during the Third Reich) drew together members of the public, family members, young volunteers from Germany and Poland, politicians (e.g. the State Secretary) and senior commentators for an extended exploration of the legacies of resistance, a meeting which culminated in a widely attended (and reported) public service in central Berlin. Forwertz, a documentary film company, worked closely with Chandler for two educational films on Von Trott and Von Moltke: and we understand that the latter film is screened as part of the training of German military pastors.

Chandler’s influence on the space where commemoration and ethics align came again in 2009 when he instigated the only public commemoration in Britain of the bicentennial of the birth of Abraham Lincoln, working in collaboration with the Chapter at Westminster Abbey, the embassy of the United States and supporters in Parliament and also leading members of the American Lincoln Bicentennial Commission in Washington DC. This event became a significant affirmation of a progressive Anglo-American affinity, beginning with a special choral evensong at the Abbey itself, a wreath-laying ceremony at the Lincoln statute in Parliament Square, a public lecture and debate in St Margaret’s, Westminster (led by Lords Hurd, Owen and Bingham and attended by c. 150 people). In July 2012 Chandler was invited to join with Professor Sir Diarmaid McCulloch, Oxford, Professor Eamon Duffy, Cambridge, and Dr Jeremy Morris, Cambridge, to advise the Chapter on the role that historical research might play in the future life and work of the Abbey.

Sources to corroborate the impact

  1. Letters of confirmation of impact on file from: Dr Anthony Cane (Dean of Chichester Cathedral); the Rt Revd Graham James (Bishop of Norwich); Ms Eileen Mackevich (Executive Director of the Lincoln Bicentennial Commission); and Annemarie Franke (Director of Krzyżowa Memorial).
  2. Review and comment of Chandler’s research in the theological press demonstrates an intellectual influence/point of discussion. EG: The Church Times made the release of Chandler’s co-authored book on Archbishop Fisher their cover story at the time of the appointment of the new Archbishop of Canterbury, publishing a long extract (14/9/2012);The Church Times reviewed his appearance on Great Lives (12/4/13).
    http://www.churchtimes.co.uk/articles/2013/12-april/reviews/radio/was-bell-beastly; and again in The Church Times Alan Wilkinson described Chandlers’ 2008 short book on Bell as `just what is needed’ (9/1/2009). The Anglo-Catholic magazine New Directions reviewed the book as `immensely accessible to a wider audience’. Meanwhile, the Church of England Newspaper covered his monograph on Fisher. His work, `Piety and Provocation was reviewed in The Tablet in 2008. See: (http://archive.thetablet.co.uk/article/6th-december-2008/25/speaking-up-for-christian-civilisation).
  3. Bloggers and commentators, reviewing, debating and commentating on Chandler’s work online include: http://eurobishop.blogspot.co.uk/ (blog of Bishop David Hamid); and for reviews of Chandler’s work, see also, Jesus4u.co.uk,
    http://www.jesus4u.co.uk/reviews/piety-and-provocation.
    And, similarly, Frank Field, Saints and Heroes: Inspiring Politics (London: SPCK, 2010) uses and debates Chandler’s work in chapters 6-7 (pp. 82-100).
  4. Local Radio Interviews at time of Queen’s Coronation: Chandler gave 8 interviews in total to various local radio from Solent to Northampton with a combined audience of between 0.5 and 1M). He explained Fisher’s role as Archbishop of Canterbury.
  5. Bell Anniversary commemorations:
    Dr Rowan Williams plaudit
    `http://rowanwilliams.archbishopofcanterbury.org/articles.php/1348/university-of-chichester-bishop-george-bell-lecture `George Bell, 1883-1958 A Bishop to Remember, A Study Course for His Diocese to mark the 50th anniversary of his death’. See sources and
    acknowledgements,http://www.chichestercathedral.org.uk/dyn/_assets/_pdfs/BellStudyCourse.A4pdf.pdf; Bell Exhibition, House of Lords, see: http://www.parliament.uk/visiting/exhibitions-and-events/exhibitions/bishop-bell/
  6. Great Lives: Radio 4 March 2013, Mr Hitchens has acknowledged Chandler’s major part in the programme in his blog entry of 29/3/13.
    http://hitchensblog.mailonsunday.co.uk/speechmaking/;
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio/siteusage/#downloads (Radio 4 March 2013, Audience reach of 10,978,000 (Rajar.co.uk figures); on average 130,270 downloads per month across whole series (Based on BBC data)).
  7. Anniversary book on Bell: Andrew Chandler, Piety and Provocation: A Study of George Bell, Bishop of Chichester, 1929-1958 (Humanitas Subsidia Series, 2008). Print run of 1000.
  8. Helmuth James von Motlke (30 minute DVD) Forwertz, Düsseldorf; Adam von Trott zu Solz (40 minute DVD) Forwertz, Düsseldorf. See, http://www.geschichte-begreifen.info/de/helmuth-james-von-moltke.html
  9. 200th Anniversary of Abraham Lincoln, Westminster Abbey, Professor Richard Carwardine lecture: “I also want to pay a special and warm tribute to Dr Andrew Chandler, Director of the George Bell Institute at the University of Chichester, whose initiative this has been.”http://static.westminster-abbey.org/assets/pdf_file/0015/23046/AL-the-Mission-of-America.pdf
  10. Supporting testimonials on request: the Rt Hon Frank Field, MP; Lord Lloyd of Berwick; Rt Revd Stephen Platten, Bishop of Wakefield; and Very Revd John Hall, Dean of Westminster.

Sept 5 2019 – “Sir Cliff Richard accepts £2m from BBC towards legal costs” – AOL/PA

https://www.aol.co.uk/news/2019/09/04/sir-cliff-richard-accepts-a-2m-from-bbc-towards-legal-costs/

Sir Cliff Richard accepts £2m from BBC towards legal costs

 

Sir Cliff Richard has agreed a final settlement with the BBC and will receive around £2 million towards his legal costs.

The singer, 78, sued the broadcaster over its coverage of the police search of his Berkshire home in 2014.

The judge ruled in the singer’s favour last year, awarding him £210,000 in damages.

Sir Cliff Richard with Gloria Hunniford, during his case against the BBC
Sir Cliff Richard with Gloria Hunniford, during his case against the BBC (Dominic Lipinski/PA)

 

Sir Cliff told the trial he had spent more than £3 million on the case.

Following the final settlement, a spokesman for the singer said he was still “substantially out of pocket”.

A statement said: “Sir Cliff incurred these costs over a five-year period as a direct result of the actions of the BBC and South Yorkshire Police.

“He is of course glad that an agreement about costs has now been reached.

“Ultimately, however, Sir Cliff is substantially out of pocket (a seven figure sum), not least because there are costs that he has not sought to recover from the parties.”

Sir Cliff Richard
Sir Cliff Richard (Kirsty O’Connor)

The BBC also paid £315,000 to South Yorkshire Police for legal costs.

A BBC spokeswoman said: “We are pleased that Sir Cliff Richard, the BBC and South Yorkshire Police have reached an amicable settlement of Sir Cliff Richard’s legal costs.

“The BBC’s costs are within the scope of our legal insurance. This brings the legal process to its conclusion.”

The pop star has previously told how the trauma of BBC coverage of the police search of his home, following a claim of historical sexual assault, left him emotionally drained.

Sir Cliff was not arrested and did not face charges.

He later said: “They smeared my name around the world.”

He added: “I’ve had four terrible years and it was horrific… I would never wish that on my worst enemy. It was tumultuous, horrific, emotionally draining, traumatic.”

Earlier this year, Sir Cliff launched a petition so that those accused of sexual offences remain anonymous until charged.